My reflection on 2016

This will be my last post for 2016 so I thought it an idea to reflect back on what has happened this year.

2016 has been a great year work wise (and personally too, but this is more of a ‘work’ type blog, so I’ll skip that). I’ve continued co-running our RBI global QA Chapter with Bhagya (https://bhagyagdm.wordpress.com/), bringing 75 testers together on a quarterly basis to create a testing community, where we help each other, ask questions, give support, perform demo’s etc, and we are looking at how we can reboot the Chapters for other disciplines.

I’ve also been jointly running the Distributed Teams workshops with Bhagya which we both learned about at the March 2016 Test Bash from Lisa Crispin and Abby Bangser – we have done 3 internally, and all were very successful.

In April at the UK Test Management Forum, I presented a talk on the Challenges for Test Managers, as there are less of us. What does the future hold? It was an interesting discussion and led onto another talk in December – see below!

From TestBash, I brought back to my team the concept of Lean Coffee meetings, and we adopted those for our team meetings and also for the QA Chapters – hugely successful as it gives every tester a voice, whether they are shy and unused to speaking openly or not.

Then I found that I spent the summer preparing for a busy Q4:

In October I presented by first Webinar, thanks to Unicom, on Being a Better Tester. It went down so well, that I am now presenting it as a talk at Testing Showcase North in Manchester in February 2017!

In November I had an amazing visit to India, where I was privileged to speak in front of a large number of testers about Being a Better Tester – essentially delivering my webinar live. Also I ran a smaller version of the Distributed Teams workshop for the team we work with and they found it hugely informative. (More details on my India visit blog page).

And in December, I spoke at the British Computer Society, Testing Interest Group on ‘Challenges for Test Managers’ after being invited to do so, following on from my April session. It was a privilege to be asked and to be able to run an interactive session with a larger number of attendees, which I felt was very rewarding. I have just typed up a small article for the BCS Tester magazine to report back on the talk and the ideas that came from the audience, as I find that a lot of conferences don’t do enough of this – we should do more interactive thought gathering sessions and share that around.

It feels that this year has been about adding value to others. Giving something back and helping others to do their jobs better – this is the reason I go to work, and why I do conferences, articles and this blog. If I am not making a difference, then what is my purpose? It’s something that is very important to me.

So, now I am starting to look forward to 2017, and there’s a lot lined up already:

  • I have a magazine article coming out in January (Test Magazine) on ‘Changing our approach to Training – how tester training needs to evolve’.
  • In February I have the Manchester talk.
  • A week later Bhagya and I are leading a session on Communication at the inaugural UKSTAR event, which I am hugely excited about.
  • In May I am hopefully speaking at the National Software Testing Conference.
  • I have also volunteered to be a mentor to a new speaker, which will happen later in the year.
  • And I am still involved in helping with the UKTMF, which will be getting a revamp in 2017.

It’s great to have all this planned before getting to the end of 2016, but it takes effort. Nothing just falls into your lap – I have had to put myself forward to do these things, and it is definitely worth it.

If you have read any of my postings this year, I would like to say thank you. I do enjoy receiving comments – I know that someone has either found it useful or challenged enough by what I say to respond. Without readers, it wouldn’t be worth doing!

I wish you a very Happy Christmas and a prosperous and successful New Year. Here’s to 2017!

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